Sex In The 1970s

Wow. The title got your attention.

Maybe this is not the sex in the 1970s you expected, but instead it is a look at some of the singles hits that had the word sex in it. There are not that many at all.
So lay back and think of sex.

Of course we accept the word sexy too.


So here is Hot Chocolate with You Sexy Thing, and another obvious hit for Rod Stewart with Da you think I'm Sexy?

And what about Disco Tex and the Sex O lettes with Get Dancin', and  I Wanna To Dance Wit Choo was the follow up in 1975. Check the lyrics here.





Of course the incredible James Brown in 1970 had a hit that never dates. Get Up (I Feel Like Being A)Sex Machine. This was a double A side for the group, and reached No. 15 in the Billboard Top 100. James Brown was born in 1933 and is still known as the Godfather of Soul. On Christmas Day in 2006, James died of a heart problem.


In 1976 the group Sex Pistols appeared in the UK charts, which meant PUNK was here. From the album Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols. Lead singer John Lyndon was discovered by Malcom McLaren and Vivian Westwood. The drummer was Paul Cook, and the guitarist was Glenn Matlock who left the group in 1977. The group actually started in 1972 called The Strand.


The group stormed the charts over the next few years, and even had a live television swearing match with TV interviewer Bill Grundy. All this did was to make them MORE famous. In 1977 they had  a huge hit, that was never really played on the radio called God Save The Queen. The song was assumed to be an anti royalty song, coming at the time of the Queens Silver Jubilee celebrations. In fact the group tired to play the song on the Jubilee day on the River Thames. They failed.


More hits were to follow for the group that changed the music in the 1970s. We will look at those hits another time.

Ian Dury was born in  1942, and was a poet and he didn't know it. He was the lead singer for Ian Dury and the Blockheads, and had a sex hit in 1977 as Ian Dury with Sex & Drugs, and Rock & Roll on Stiff records. The single was never a big hit because some radio stations banned it, wrongly thinking it was endorsing sex, drugs and alcohol.




A lot more sex to come in the 1970s, so watch this space.

Comments